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Sunday, July 5, 2020 | History

1 edition of Demography and ecology of a declining snowshoe hare population found in the catalog.

Demography and ecology of a declining snowshoe hare population

Demography and ecology of a declining snowshoe hare population

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Published by Wildlife Society in [S.l.] .
Written in


Edition Notes

Statementby Lloyd B. Keith... [et al.].
SeriesWildlife monographs / The Wildlife Society -- No.90, Wildlife monographs -- No.90.
ContributionsKeith, Lloyd B.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14503618M

Demography of snowshoe hares in relation to regional climate variability during a year population cycle in interior Alaska 1 K. Kielland, K. Olson, and E. Euskirchen Abstract: We monitored populations of snowshoe hares (Lepus american us, Erxleben) in interior Alaska for 10years from to Background The snowshoe hare is a cold-adapted species that ranges from the northern Canadian Arctic and extends south along the Sierra Nevada, Appalachian, and Rocky mountain ranges In eastern North America, the range extends to just south of New England, although along the Appalachian Mountains snowshoe hares can be found as far south as North Carolina and Tennessee 2.

Aaron J Wirsing, Todd D Steury, Dennis L Murray, A demographic analysis of a southern snowshoe hare population in a fragmented habitat: evaluating the refugium model, Canadian Journal of Zoology, /z, 80, 1, (), ().   Snowshoe hares that camouflage themselves by changing their coats from brown in summer to white in winter face serious threats from climate change, and it’s uncertain whether hare populations will be able to adapt in time, according to a North Carolina State University study.

Snowshoe hare, (Lepus americanus), also called snowshoe rabbit or varying hare, northern North American species of hare that undergoes an annual colour change from brownish or grayish in summer to pure white in winter. The hind feet are heavily furred, and all four feet are large in proportion to body size, a snowshoe-like adaptation that enables the hare to travel over snow. For the past 14 years, my Winter Ecology students and I have spent a lot of time outdoors, studying the preferred habitat features and winter foods of snowshoe hares. We’re likely to find hare tracks hopping in and around lowland conifers near wetland edges, and then again at higher elevations, where the forest transitions into fir, birch.


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Demography and ecology of a declining snowshoe hare population Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Demography and ecology of a declining snowshoe hare population. [Lloyd Burrows Keith; Wildlife Society.;] -- Results of a study of snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) populations at Rochester, Alberta, from late November to mid-Aprilthe second winter of a cyclic decline.

Purpose to test hypothesis. demography and ecology of a declining snowshoe hare population [central alberta] paperback – by et al Keith, Lloyd B. (Author)Author: et al Keith, Lloyd B. Snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus Erxleben) populations were studied in south‐west Yukon during the low phase of the 10‐year population availability and predator abundance were manipulated in a factorial design to determine the importance of each factor in hare Cited by: Many theories were no more than conjectures.

Inrealizing that further theorizing would get him nowhere, Keith and a team of researchers from the Wisconsin school of wildlife ecology, launched a long-term field study on snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) populations near Rochester, Alberta. A number of important papers from this study have Cited by: Alaska.

Population dynamics in their southern range were previously thought to be noncyclic, in contrast to the strong year fluctuation that typifies boreal populations of snowshoe hares.

Time series data and studies of hare demography indicate that northern and southern populations of hares may instead have similar population dynamics. Charles J. Krebs, Rudy Boonstra, Stan Boutin, A.R.E.

Sinclair, What Drives the year Cycle of Snowshoe Hares. The ten-year cycle of snowshoe hares—one of the most striking features of the boreal forest— is a product of the interaction between predation and food supplies, as large-scale experiments in the yukon have demonstrated, BioScience, Vol Issue 1, JanuaryPages.

Natural feeding experiment on snowshoe hares at Kluane Lake, Yukon, during a population decline, – Two control trapping areas (red and blue symbols) were monitored until October when the feeding experiment began on one area (symbols) with winter feeding of felled white spruce and aspen trees (dark green symbols, Krebs, Boutin, et al., ).

Parasitism in a declining population of snowshoe hares Article (PDF Available) in Journal of wildlife diseases 22(3) August with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Density and Demography of Snowshoe Hares in Central Colorado JACOB S.

IVAN,1 (Hodges b). Hare ecology in these areas is not as well understood (Hodges b) but is theSouthernRockieswhere aneffort to restore a viable population of the federally threatened Canada lynx has recently concluded (U.S. Fish and Wildlife. Snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) populations across northern Canada and Alaska undergo 8- to year cycles in numbers, but population trends in southern Canada and the contiguous United States are apparently either weakly cyclic, irruptive, or largely gh the demographic attributes (population density, reproductive rates, and survival rates) of northern and southern hare.

We counted the number of snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) fecal pellets on 50 quadrats of m 2 on each of six areas near Kluane Lake, Yukon Territory, once a year from to On four of these areas we livetrapped hares once a month and estimated population density.

The snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), also called the varying hare, or snowshoe rabbit, is a species of hare found in North has the name "snowshoe" because of the large size of its hind feet. The animal's feet prevent it from sinking into the snow when it hops and walks.

Keith, Lloyd B. & Windberg, Lamar A.A demographic analysis of the snowshoe hare cycle / by Lloyd B. Keith and Lamar A. Windberg Wildlife Society [Washington] Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required.

Population dynamics in their southern range were previously thought to be noncyclic, in contrast to the strong year fluctuation that typifies boreal populations of snowshoe hares. Time series data and studies of hare demography indicate that northern and southern populations of hares may instead have similar population dynamics.

To improve understanding of snowshoe hare ecology in the Southern Rockies and enhance the ability of agency personnel to manage subalpine landscapes for snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) and lynx (Lynx canadensis) in the region, we estimated snowshoe hare density, survival, and recruitment in west‐central Colorado, USA from July –March Spatial population structure has important ecological and evolutionary consequences.

Little is known about the population structure of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus), despite their ecological importance in North American boreal used seven variable microsatellite DNA loci to determine the spatial genetic structure of snowshoe hares near Kluane Lake, Yukon during a cyclic. The Ecology of Snowshoe Hares in Northern Boreal Forests Karen E.

Hodges, Centre for Biodiversity Research, University of British Columbia, University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Abstract—Snowshoe hares exhibit eight to 11 year population fluctuations across boreal North America, typically with an amplitude of 10 to 25 fold. Abstract. Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) and their predators fluctuate cyclically in abundance every 9–11 years in the southwestern populations occurred in – and in –90 around Kluane Lake.

During the first cycle (–84) we tested food limitation hypotheses by providing three hare populations with supplemental food (rabbit chow). Journal of Animal Ecology (), 57, POPULATION BIOLOGY OF SNOWSHOE HARES.

INTERACTIONS WITH WINTER FOOD PLANTS BY J. SMITH*, C. KREBS*, A. SINCLAIR* AND R. BOONSTRA t * The Ecology Group, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, University Blvd, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2A9, and t Division of Life.

Researchers have concluded that Michigan’s snowshoe hare population is declining at an alarming rate, and they are linking this problem partially to the effects of climate change. Gary Roloff, associate professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, spearheaded the research as part of a study funded by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Rates of population change were negative from towhen predation pressure was most intense after the snowshoe hare decline, and positive from .The phenomenology and causes of snowshoe hare cycles are addressed via construction of a three‐trophic‐level population dynamics model in which hare populations are limited by the availability of winter browse from below and by predation from above.

Every 10 years snowshoe hare populations across the boreal forest of North America go through a population cycle, culminating in a decline lasting 4 or more years. We tested the hypothesis that snowshoe hares during the decline are in poor condition and less able to respond to challenges in their environment by examining the stress response of.